Craft School Art Sale
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The exhibition “Craft School” took place at the Shelter in Place Gallery in Boston July 20-26, 2020, in support of The Black School. The Craft School Art Sale is inspired by the excellent Art for Philadelphia model. The sale is now closed. 

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The Black School is an experimental art school teaching Black/PoC students and allies to become agents of change through art workshops on radical Black politics and public interventions that address local community needs. The Black School was founded by Joseph Cuillier III and Shani Peters in 2016, socially engaged artists, designers, and educators working at the intersections of K-12/university teaching, art, design, and activism. All programming at The Black School is designed around their core principles of Black Love, self-determination, and wellness.

Shelter in Place is a miniature-scale gallery where 1 inch = 1 foot. Started by artist Eben Haines during the global coronavirus pandemic, it is a way to support artists and audiences while most other art spaces are closed.

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All sales are final. The artists retain all copyrights to their work across all formats, in perpetuity. 

Craft School Poster (on Citrine paper with rainbow roll ink)
Designed by Aasawari Kulkarni using her Nari typeface.

Of the font, Aasawari says: “Nari is an experiment in variable font technology that attempts at answering the question, “what would it mean for a typeface to be feminist?”. The result is an interactive variable typeface designed by a woman of color, one that has multiple voices, that represent choice, expression, and inclusivity; does not belong to any one extreme, and is fluid in nature. It breaks away from the traditional “acceptable” proportions of letter design and is anything but neutral. Nari—meaning woman in Hindi, can generate various different styles, similar to how a woman is a powerhouse, assuming different roles at given points of time.

Printed by DWRI Letterpress in Providence, RI

All proceeds after shipping costs go directly to The Black School

Craft School Poster (on Moon Blue paper with rainbow roll ink)
Designed by Aasawari Kulkarni using her Nari typeface.

Of the font, Aasawari says: “Nari is an experiment in variable font technology that attempts at answering the question, “what would it mean for a typeface to be feminist?”. The result is an interactive variable typeface designed by a woman of color, one that has multiple voices, that represent choice, expression, and inclusivity; does not belong to any one extreme, and is fluid in nature. It breaks away from the traditional “acceptable” proportions of letter design and is anything but neutral. Nari—meaning woman in Hindi, can generate various different styles, similar to how a woman is a powerhouse, assuming different roles at given points of time.

Printed by DWRI Letterpress in Providence, RI

All proceeds after shipping costs go directly to The Black School


Samantha Nye
Island in the Stream, 2020
10 x 14.1”

Color printed on archival-grade Hahnemuhle Photo Rag at I/O Labs in Providence, RI. 

After production and shipping, 50% of sale to the artist (bc artists should always be paid) / 50% of sale to The Black School.

This work draws on glitzy Hollywood photographer Slim Aarons’ mid-century images of “attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places” but subverts Aarons' reductive stereotypes of race, class, and gender by reframing his images of white people in wealthy leisure environments. Instead, painting in queer elders cast from communities she meets during her research, as well as her own mom and grandmother, Sam inserts them into these historic scenes to create fantasies that function as an imaginary future “bound by the concept of chosen family” that is age and trans inclusive. Painting queer kinship, Sam acknowledges its “beautiful parts, the prickly parts, the radical parts and the parts that have long needed fixing,” imaging autonomous communities that rejected heteronormative familial structures and narrow definitions of sexuality and erotic pleasure. Thus reimagined, her paintings expand the parameters of love, agency, desire, and belonging.



Jolie Ngo
BONSAI
8.25 x 9.75"

Risograph - 4 color on EarthChoice Index Cover White 90lb paper printed at Binch Press in Providence, RI.

After production and shipping, 50% of sale to the artist (bc artists should always be paid) / 50% of sale to The Black School.

Jolie Ngo grew up in Philadelphia, PA. She recently finished her BFA in Ceramics at Rhode Island School of Design. This fall, she will be an MFA candidate at Alfred University NYS College of Ceramics.

She takes objects that are historically viewed as minimal and humble and lovingly dresses them in vibrant patterns or hazy gradients with hand-crafted actions that mimic digital effects. She uses the vessel as a conduit between tradition and personal experience, a symbol that evokes the long history of craft, while acting as a stand-in for a body.